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Celebrating 65 years of Portable Fire Extinguisher Standards in Ireland

Posted on 21 Sep 2015

2015-09-21 12.58.25 2015-09-21 12.59.10.

In 1950 a committee set up by the Minister for Local Government produced a code of standards as a guide. These standards were revised in 1967 “fire protection standards” as recommended by the department of local government were published by the Stationary Office. Available to be purchased through any Bookseller, or directly from the Government Publications Sales Office, G.P.O Arcade, Dublin 1, for the princely sum of .20p…….So it appears we have been at this for some time.


IS 291:2002 Revoked by NSAI, IS 291: 2015 declared a Standard.

Posted on 20 Aug 2015

The NSAI with consent from the Minister of Jobs, Enterprise and Innovation have revoked IS 291:2002 “The use, siting, inspection and maintenance of portable fire extinguishers”

IS 291:2015 “Selection, commissioning, installation, inspection and maintenance of portable fire extinguishers” has been declared to be a “Standard Specification”

please see link below:

IRIS August 18th 2015


IS 291: 2015 Fire Extinguisher Engineer Training Course – Third Party Accredited

Posted on 18 Aug 2015

looking to get competent in Portable Fire Extinguisher Standards, IS 291:2015 is on the way and there is no better time than now to get you or your staff Trained in the 3 day Mechanical Fire Safety Engineering Workshop.

As “Irelands Only” Third Party Accredited Mechanical Fire Safety Engineering Three Day workshop which is titled The Fire Safety Workshop Series, each student on a course whom the Instructors assess as competent shall be issued by Mr Brendan Kavanagh, Chartered Safety Practitioner a “JOIFF” accredited certificate of Competence signed by an authorised person.

Incorporating:

      • Portable Fire Fighting Extinguishers
      • Fire Fighting Hose Reels
      • Dry Risers
      • Hydrants

 

Applicable to and Why:

The course is applicable to all who are actively involved with the Recommendation/Selection, Installation, Inspection, Service and Maintenance of the above listed equipment

The course is designed to help understand the Statutory Safety Legislation, Regulations & Competency obligations within the specific areas.

The scope of the Fire Extinguisher maintenance workshop is based on best practice in the Irish Fire Protection industry with a baseline on technical standards incorporating Irish Standard 291 (2002) and Irish Standard EN 3 (2007).

The programme style is based on a balance between practical workshop experience over forty years and a baseline of the current (2014) research and development of  Fire Protection standards and specification development

Facilitator:

Course Director & Tutor Mr Brendan Kavanagh

M.I.F.S.M – M.I.E.T. – C.M.I.O.S.H – G.I Fire Engineers – M.I.H.E.E.M

Chartered Fire Safety Practitioner &

Professional Fire Prevention Officer

  • Mr Brendan Kavanagh, Chartered Safety Practitioner, has been approved as a JOIFF accredited Training Provider 

Accreditation & Certification

INTERNATIONAL ORGANISATION FOR INDUSTRIAL HAZARD MANAGEMENT

Full JOIFF accreditation requires an examination of the three pillars that make up effective provision of training, courses/programmes, Instruction and establishment/organisation including facilities. All aspects together must be to the required standard and the applicant organisation must demonstrate proprietary ownership of all 3 pillars for JOIFF accreditation to be awarded. read more about JOIFF   http://joiff.com/

Workshop style

Conference room electronic with supporting practical exercises. It is recommended that participants bring a Laptop or similar device capable of receiving Wi-Fi, (Wi-Fi facility available in the hotel) all of the workshop presentation slides and guides are published and distributed electronically in PDF. Format

All participants will be required to subscribe to a risk management and safety culture which requires all participants during practical workshop sessions and demonstrations to ensure their personal safety in respect to Eye, Hand and Foot protection

All of the Workshop sessions will commence at 0900hrs and finish at 1700hrs each day. As the Workshop is certified and third party accredited by JOIFF which requires assessment of the participants during the workshop sessions and whereby each participant will be required to undertake project work between attendance days which will form a significant aspect of the assessment to enable the presentation of an individual certificate .

To book your place(s) on the course  please email to info@firetrade.ie or call Luke on mobile: 087 271 8195

Note: Firetrade.ie is fully independent and is not a member or accredited by any third party Association.


Conductivity Testing For 5kg C02 Discharge Hoses

Posted on 22 May 2015

A definition for “conductivity” is “the property or power of conducting heat, electricity or sound.” This pertains to CO2 hoses in that the wire strands inside the hose must be connected and in good shape from one end of the hose to the other. There are many ways to measure conductivity. You can use a meter that is used in the electrical industry, remove hose from the extinguisher, put meter setting on OHM or Continuity, touch one end on the metal with one prong and the same on the far end with the other prong, any reading other then “0″ is a fail. Most commonly used in the US is a small unit that is battery operated with a metal point and LED light. You grab one end of the hose by the metal and touch the other end of the hose with the pointed tip. If the light comes on you have continuity from one end to the other. What that conductivity test doesn’t tell you is how many of those strands are connected or if they are in good shape. After examining the hose we also determined that the rubber that is the outside protective layer for those strands appeared to be in good shape. No weather checks, cracking, or bulges to lead us to believe that there was a problem under the surface. They were still in good enough shape to allow for a “passing” conductivity test but not good enough to withstand the cold and back pressure within the hose when the discharged CO2 gas hit the diverter at the end of the hose. So what should someone performing annual maintenance in such a situation do? Even after fulfilling all the requirements for the proper servicing and testing of a CO2 hose, it would be good to take one or two more steps. You need to grab that hose with both hands, leaving about three to four inches between your hands, and flex that hose. Keep moving your hands down the hose until you have done the entire length of hose. If you come across a crack or hard spot that maybe you couldn’t see without flexing the hose or hear a crunching-type noise then you will know that the hose you are visually inspecting is deteriorating under the rubber protective layer. This would be a good time to replace that hose.


Clean Agents in Aviation Fire Protection

Posted on 1 Apr 2015

For more than three decades, Halon 1301 and Halon 1211 played a key role in the fire protection of airport facilities and aircraft, and they continue to provide fire protection in critical applications such as cargo bay protection. However, clean agent Halon replacements are gradually finding their way into on-board aircraft applications including engine nacelle and lavatory trash receptacle protection systems, and are ideally suited for the protection of ground-based mission critical assets.

For more than three decades, Halon 1301 (CF3Br) and Halon 1211 (CF2BrCl) have been widely employed for the protection of airport facilities and aircraft. The Halons are “clean” agents, leaving no corrosive or abrasive residues after their use, thus eliminating the secondary (non-fire) damage associated with extinguishing agents such as water, dry chemicals or foams. In addition, the Halons are non-conductors of electricity; hence they are applicable for the protection of electronic equipment. Halon 1211, characterised by a low vapour pressure, is most suitable as a streaming agent in flight-line applications and in portable extinguishers, whereas the more volatile Halon 1301 is best suited as a total flooding suppression agent for the protection of engine nacelles, auxiliary power units (APUs), cargo bays, control rooms and facilities housing mission critical equipment.

Due to their unique combination of chemical and physical properties, Halon 1301 and Halon 1211 served as nearly ideal fire suppression agents. However, due to their implication in the destruction of stratospheric ozone, the Montreal Protocol of 1987 identified Halon 1301 and Halon 1211 as two of numerous compounds requiring limitations of use and production, and an amendment to the original Protocol resulted in the halting of Halon production on January 1, 1994.

Clean Agent Fire Protection for Airports

Airport fire protection needs include the following:

  • Control tower protection.
  • Electronic control/computer room protection.
  • Records storage facility protection.
  • Ground incident protection.
  • Flight-line protection.The halogenated agents can be stored as liquids, allowing for a much larger mass of agent to be stored in the same volume compared with inert gases, significantly reducing the number of cylinders required with these systems compared to inert gas systems. In addition, the halocarbon agents can be stored in standard low pressure cylinders and employ standard piping.Control Tower ProtectionIn the United States alone there are approximately 7,000 aircraft in the sky at any given time. Air traffic controllers are tasked to ensure the safe operation of commercial and private aircraft, and must coordinate the movements of thousands of aircraft during take-off, flight and landing, directing them around bad weather and ensuring that air traffic flows smoothly. The mission critical nature of control tower operation demands a fire protection system that provides rapid fire extinguishment and results in a minimum amount of downtime following a fire incident – clean agents are hence an ideal fire protection option.Electronic Control, Computer & Records Storage Room ProtectionGround Incident ProtectionFlight-line ProtectionMinimum fire requirements for aircraft hangars are contained in NFPA 409 Standard on Aircraft Hangars.Although water-based systems such as deluge systems were employed in the past, NFPA 409 does not recognise these as viable systems. Foam-water deluge systems are now the norm for hangar protection.Typical commercial aircraft fire zones equipped with fire extinguishing systems include:
  • Fire Protection for Commercial Aircraft
  • The parking area and maintenance hangars, where aircraft are on-loaded, off-loaded, and serviced, present significant fire protection challenges. In addition to foam-based systems, 68kg wheeled units of clean agents Halon 1211 or Halotron I (HCFC Blend B) are commonly employed in flight-line fire protection.
  • Ground-level fire threats include high-speed and/or high-angle ground impact incidents, low-speed and/or shallow ground impact angles, and fire incidents involving aircraft in a landing, take-off, or taxi mode. Aircraft Rescue and Firefighting (ARFF) services employ specialised vehicles to transport rescue and firefighting personnel, equipment and extinguishing agents to the scene of aircraft accidents. NFPA 403Standard for Aircraft Rescue and Fire Fighting Services at Airports contains the minimum requirements for ARFF services. NFPA 403 requires ARFF vehicles to carry one or more of AFFF, fluoroprotein foam, protein foam or fluorine-free synthetic foam as a primary agent, and to carry as a complimentary agent one or both of a potassium-based agent or a halogenated agent. In most cases the halogenated agent employed is either Halon 1301 or Halon 1211.
  • In addition to the air control tower, mission critical facilities within airports also include control rooms, computer rooms and record storage rooms. FM-200 and Inergen clean agent systems are widely employed in these facilities, providing both rapid fire extinguishment and minimum downtime in the event of a fire. Table 1 indicates a selection of the numerous airports worldwide employing FM-200 clean agent systems for the protection of control, computer and record storage rooms.
  • The most widely employed clean agents for air control tower protection are FM-200 (HFC-227ea) and Inergen (blend of N2, Ar, and CO2). For example, the world’s tallest air control tower, located at the Kuala Lumpur Airport’s new terminal (KLIA2) in Malaysia, employs FM-200systems for the protection of numerous rooms within the air control tower structure.
  • Critical to the operation of any airport is the air control tower.
  • The most widely employed clean agents in aviation applications, due to their high volumetric efficiency and low weight and volume requirements, are the HFC-based clean agents HFC-227ea (FM-200) and HFC-125 (FE-25).
  • Clean agents consist of two broad classes of agent: inert gas agents and halocarbon agents. Inert gas agents cannot be compressed to the liquid state, and therefore must be stored as high pressure gases. This in turn necessitates the use of high pressure storage cylinders and high pressure piping for inert gas systems, adding significant cost to inert gas suppression systems. The low volumetric efficiency of the inert gas agents and their inability to be stored as liquids leads to the requirement of a large number of system cylinders compared with halocarbon systems. This in turn leads to the requirement for additional storage space and increased system footprint, adding further to the cost of inert gas systems. Due to the inherent weight and volume penalties associated with inert gas systems, their use in aviation applications is limited compared with that of halocarbon clean agent systems such as hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) systems.
  • Engine nacelle and APU.
  • Lavatories.
  • Crew and passenger cabins.
  • Cargo and baggage compartments.Despite the successful employment of HFC-125 by the US military in engine nacelle/APU fire protection, to date there have been no examples of the replacement of Halon 1301 in the engine nacelle or APUs of commercial aircraft, and Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) research in this area is ongoing. A minimum performance standard (MPS) for engines and auxiliary power unit compartments has been established by the FAA in cooperation with international airworthiness authorities that seeks the current level of safety provided by Halon 1301 at 6 percent volumetric concentration throughout the protected zone for a duration of one-half second.The inability of the commercial aircraft industry to identify a Halon 1301 replacement for engine nacelle/APU protection has led to the formation of the Engine/APU Halon Replacement Industry Consortium (IC), whose goal is to define a common non-Halon fire extinguishing solution for use in engine/APU fire zones. The IC includes airframe manufacturers, system manufacturers, airworthiness authorities and agent producers. The current IC goal is to down-select to a single agent by the end of 2015.The requirement for an automatic fire extinguishing system in aircraft lavatory trash receptacles was proposed in FAA Notice 84-5 as a consequence of two incidents. The first involved a cabin fire aboard an Air Canada flight in 1983, in which 23 people perished. The second occurred in the same year at Tampa International Airport, without injuries or loss of life.Cabin ProtectionCurrently, no technical barriers exist to the replacement of Halon 1211 in this application, as HFC-227ea (FM-200), HFC-236fa (FE-36), and HCFC Blend B (Halotron I) systems have passed all of the tests required by the Handheld MPS. Despite this, there has been no replacement of Halon 1211 in handheld extinguishers on-board commercial aircraft.The inability of the commercial aircraft industry to identify a Halon 1301 replacement for cargo/baggage compartment protection has led to the formation of the Cargo Compartment Halon Replacement Working Group, whose goal is to define a common non-Halon fire extinguishing solution for use in cargo/baggage compartment fire zones. The working group includes airframe manufacturers, system manufacturers, airworthiness authorities and agent producers. The current working group goal is to down-select to a single agent by the end of 2015.In contrast to the situation in the commercial aviation industry, the US military has made significant progress in replacing Halon 1301 in engine nacelle applications. Despite weight, space, and the associated cost penalties, HFC-125 has been adopted in a number of US military engine/APU applications. A Department of Defence (DOD) program has been developed that includes a design model allowing designers to calculate HFC-125 agent mass requirements for a particular engine nacelle or APU compartment. In the case of the U.S. Navy’s F/A-18E/F, the mass of HFC-125 shown to meet the design challenge was found to be considerably less than that originally predicted by the DOD model.Table 2 shows a selection of US military aircraft currently employing clean agents. HFC-125 is employed for engine nacelle protection in the F/A-18E/F Super Hornet, the F-22 Raptor, the V-22 Osprey tilt-rotor aircraft, and the H-92, UH-1Y and AH-1Z upgraded helicopters. Inert gas generators protect the dry bays on the V-22 Osprey and the F/A-18E/F Super Hornet. On-board inert gas generating (OBIGG) systems are employed to inert the fuel tanks of the V-22 Osprey, F/A-18E/F Super Hornet, and the F/A-35 Lightning II Joint Strike Fighter.For more than three decades, the clean agents Halon 1301 and Halon 1211 have played a key role in the fire protection of airport facilities and aircraft, and the Halons continue to provide fire protection in critical applications such as cargo bay protection where no suitable replacements have been developed. Clean agent Halon replacements, especially the HFC-based agents, are gradually finding their way into on-board aircraft applications including engine nacelle and lavatory trash receptacle protection systems, and are ideally suited for the protection of ground-based mission critical electronics in airport control towers, computer rooms and control rooms. Halon 1301 and Halon 1211 are no longer produced, and as the current Halon bank continues to shrink, the use of the clean agent Halon replacements in these demanding applications is expected to increase.
  • Conclusion
  • On-board inert gas generation (OBIGG) systems have been developed and employed in military aircraft to prevent the build-up of explosive conditions in fuel tanks by generating nitrogen enriched air to lower the oxygen content in the fuel tank ullage.
  • Fire Protection for Military Aircraft
  • Cargo & Baggage Compartments
  • FAA and international airworthiness regulations mandate that hand-held fire extinguishers be located in crew and passenger compartments. An MPS for handheld extinguishers has been established; the purpose of the MPS is to ensure that extinguishers using Halon replacement agents pose no reduction in safety, both in terms of effectiveness in fighting on-board fires and decomposition product toxicity. The MPS specifies Halon 1211 equivalency testing, a hidden fire test and a gasoline-drenched seat fire toxicity test.
  • Technically feasible alternatives for Halon 1301 have been identified and tested to the FAA’s Lavatory Extinguishing Unit MPS. New production aircraft are being installed with lavatory extinguishing (lavex) systems that contain either HFC-227ea or HFC-236fa. In addition, several airlines are replacing existing Halon 1301 lavex systems with HFC-227ea or HFC-236fa systems during scheduled maintenance operations.
  • Lavatories
  • Past FAA testing of agents including HFC-125, CF3I, and 2-bromo-1,1,1-trifluoro-propene (2-BTP) failed to identify a suitable Halon 1301 replacement. Recent FAA engine nacelle fire testing of a solid aerosol agent failed due to agent distribution problems, and FAA testing of a perfluoroketone agent (FK-5-1-12, Novec 1230) failed due to insufficient volatilisation of the agent at low temperatures; this same low temperature behaviour led Airbus to abandon its initial plans to replace Halon 1301 in engine nacelles/APUs with FK-5-1-12.
  • Engine Nacelle/APU

Fire Extinguisher Engineer 3 day Accredited Course

Posted on 12 Jan 2015

 

Mechanical Fire Safety Engineering Three Day workshop

2015

 

Course Title:

Third Party Accredited Mechanical Fire Safety Engineering Three Day workshop which are titled Fire Safety Workshop Series 2015

Incorporating:

      • Portable Fire Fighting Extinguishers
      • Fire Fighting Hose Reels
      • Dry Risers
      • Hydrants

 

Applicable to and Why:

The course is applicable to all who are actively involved with the Recommendation/Selection, Installation, Inspection, Service and Maintenance of the above listed equipment

The course is designed to help understand the Statutory Safety Legislation, Regulations & Competency obligations within the specific areas.

The scope of the Fire Extinguisher maintenance workshop is based on best practice in the Irish Fire Protection industry with a baseline on technical standards incorporating Irish Standard 291 (2002) and Irish Standard EN 3 (2007).

The programme style is based on a balance between practical workshop experience over forty years and a baseline of the current (2014) research and development of  Fire Protection standards and specification development

Facilitator:

Course Director & Tutor Mr Brendan Kavanagh

M.I.F.S.M – M.I.E.T. – C.M.I.O.S.H – G.I Fire Engineers – M.I.H.E.E.M

Chartered Fire Safety Practitioner &

Professional Fire Prevention Officer

  • Mr Brendan Kavanagh, Chartered Safety Practitioner, has been approved as a JOIFF accredited Training Provider 

Accreditation & Certification

INTERNATIONAL ORGANISATION FOR INDUSTRIAL HAZARD MANAGEMENT

Full JOIFF accreditation requires an examination of the three pillars that make up effective provision of training, courses/programmes, Instruction and establishment/organisation including facilities. All aspects together must be to the required standard and the applicant organisation must demonstrate proprietary ownership of all 3 pillars for JOIFF accreditation to be awarded.

Certification:

Each student on a JOIFF accredited course whom the Instructors assess as competent shall be issued by Mr Brendan Kavanagh, Chartered Safety Practitioner with a JOIFF accredited certificate of Competence signed by an authorised person.

Workshop style

Conference room electronic with supporting practical exercises. It is recommended that participants bring a Laptop or similar device capable of receiving Wi-Fi, (Wi-Fi facility available in the hotel) all of the workshop presentation slides and guides are published and distributed electronically in PDF. Format

All participants will be required to subscribe to a risk management and safety culture which requires all participants during practical workshop sessions and demonstrations to ensure their personal safety in respect to Eye, Hand and Foot protection

All of the Workshop sessions will commence at 0900hrs and finish at 1700hrs each day. As the Workshop is certified and third party accredited by JOIFF which requires assessment of the participants during the workshop sessions and whereby each participant will be required to undertake project work between attendance days which will form a significant aspect of the assessment to enable the presentation of an individual certificate .

Note: Firetrade.ie is fully independent and is not a member or accredited by any third party Association.


Commercial Kitchen Fire Suppression and Canopy & Duct Cleaning/Hygiene Symposium By KSS

Posted on 12 Jan 2015

Invitation to attend “Commercial Kitchen Canopy and Duct Fire Suppression and Hygiene Safety Symposium” in The Bewleys Hotel, Newlands Cross, Dublin @ 10.30am 0n Tuesday the 20th of March 2015.

 

The aim of the Symposium is to amongst other items update on current Fire and Hygiene Safety Standards, Best Practice and assist in understanding the reason to comply with statutory provisions.

 

The Symposium will explain, expand and promote the recommendation/maintenance and servicing of Commercial Kitchen Canopy and Ducts from a Fire Safety point of view.

 

Divided into 2 distinct sections the Symposium will deal with both Canopy Fire Suppression and Canopy & Duct Cleaning/Hygiene

 

Incorporating:

 

The benefits to employer, trade suppliers and anyone working in the Area of Fire Safety and aiding to develop “Competency and Confidence” in understanding the Fire safety obligations.

 

As an Employer/Consultant/Specifier providing Fire Safety Services understand your “Duty of Care” in making sure you, your staff and your clients benefit by education.

 

Over the past number of years the market conditions have changed and the emphasis is on Knowledge and Liability.

 

Starting with complimentary Tea & Coffee at 10.30am, the Fire Safety Symposium will start at 11.00am sharp and ending in a Questions and Answers session from 12.30pm to 1.00pm.

 

To secure your seat please RSVP tofin@kssfiresuppression.ieasap, Spaces are limited.


Fire Safety Symposium 9th December 2014

Posted on 30 Nov 2014

Free to attend “Fire Safety Symposium” in The Bewleys Hotel, Newlands Cross, Dublin @ 10.30am 0n Tuesday the 9th of December 2014
FOR THE FIRE TRADE

The aim of the Fire Safety Symposium is to amongst other items update on current Fire Safety Standards and Best Practice.

 

Conducted by Mr Brendan Kavanagh M.I.F.S.M – M.I.E.T. – C.M.I.O.S.H – G.I Fire Engineers – M.I.H.E.E.M
Mr Kavanagh is a Chartered Fire Safety Practitioner & Professional Fire Prevention Officer and has been approved as a JOIFF accredited Training Provider
The Fire Safety Symposium will explain, expand and promote the 3 day Third Party  Accredited Workshop in Fire Extinguishers, Hose Reels and Fire Hydraulics to Employers and Users.

 

The Third Party Workshop which is available to all who are actively involved with the Recommendation/Selection, Installation, Inspection, Service and Maintenance of the above listed equipment.

The course is designed to help understand the Statutory Safety Legislation, Regulations & Competency obligations within the specific areas. The scope of the Fire Extinguisher maintenance workshop is based on best practice in the Irish Fire Protection industry with a baseline on technical standards incorporating but not confined to En-671, Irish Standard 291 (2002) and Irish Standard EN-3, European Pressure Equipment Directive

 

To assist in understanding the reason to comply with statutory provisions with fire safety standard.

 

Incorporating:

 

The benefits to employer, trade suppliers and anyone working in the Area of Fire Safety and aiding to develop “Competency and Confidence” in understanding the Fire safety obligations.

 

As a an Employer providing Fire Safety Services understand your “Duty of Care” in making sure you, your staff and you clients benefit by education.

 

Over the past number of years the market conditions have changed and the emphasis is on Knowledge and Liability.

 

Starting with complimentary Tea & Coffee at 10.30am, the Fire Safety Symposium will start at 11.00am sharp and ending in a Questions and Answers session from 12.30pm to 1.00pm.

 

To secure your seat please RSVP toinfo@firetrade.ieor call luke on 0872718195 spaces are limited


The Solution to Restricted Movements on FM200 – Halons – FE13 – FE36

Posted on 2 Nov 2014

IMPORTANT NOTICE TO FIRE SUPPRESSION SELLERS/USERS/OPERATORS

The following Applies to Ozone Depleting Substances (ODS) and Greenhouse Gases, in the Fire Suppression Industry it applies to the following Greenhouse Gases – FM200, FE 36, FE 13 and the following ODS – Halon 1211 and 1301

If you are working in the area of Fire Suppression or indeed own or are responsible for a Fire Suppression System this will be of critical importance to you, this relates specifically to storing waste, returned or recovered Fire Suppression Gases in the Rep of Ireland.

Please note: There are absolutely no exemptions to the following

Halon – FM200 – FE36 – FE13 & Refrigerant Gases, these are all either Halons or Fluorinated Greenhouse Gases and require Licenses/Certificates/Authorisations for Recovery/Transport/Storage and Shipping.

Whether taking any of the above for waste/Service Exchange the restrictions apply – TO EVERYONE

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA):

“The collection and transport of waste, returned or recovered ozone depleting substances (refrigerant gases and halons) is controlled, to ensure environmental protection and compliance with waste law (the same requirements apply also to the collection and transport of waste, returned or recovered fluorinated greenhouse gases). A position paper on this subject has been published by the EPA and should be consulted by all operators handling such waste gases.

This means that the collection and transport of waste, returned or recovered ozone depleting substances can only be carried on by a person that meets one of the following requirements:-

  • Has made a Prior Annual Notification to the Environmental Protection Agency, and where that Prior Annual Notification has been acknowledged by the Agency or
  • Holds a valid Waste Collection Permit for the area(s) in which collections are taking place and for the waste types that cover ozone depleting substances (relevant EWC codes may include: 140601*, 160504*, among others).

“Waste, returned or recovered refrigerant gases, halons and fluorinated greenhouse gases must be brought to an authorised facility i.e. a facility that has either a licence from the Environmental Protection Agency, or a Waste Facility Permit or Certificate of Registration from the relevant local authority”

Please see the link below for further confirmation with the EPA website:    http://www.epa.ie/air/airenforcement/ozone/wasteodspriorannualnotifications/

Prosecutions

Prosecution is an important part of environmental law enforcement. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) encourages individuals and businesses to integrate good environmental practices into normal working methods and seeks to prevent environmental pollution before it has a chance to occur.  Where pollution does occur the EPA aims to seek redress for environmental pollution and avoid a recurrence.  Where the circumstances warrant it, immediate prosecution will be pursued.

http://www.epa.ie/pubs/advice/air/ods/wasterefrigerants-epaposition.html#.VFYPMTPA7IU

In order to provide this complete in house service a company must have achieved a range of licenses and Certificates from Government, Local Government and EU Monitoring/Controlling Bodies.

What we have done in order to offer the trade a service that complies with all of the above.

Having foreseen the impending controls and restrictions we have taken the necessary measure to ensure that we can offer a fully compliant service for the

collection and transport of waste, returned or recovered ozone depleting substances (refrigerant gases and halons) that are controlled, to ensure environmental protection and compliance with waste law.

Over the past 2 years we have contracted relevant consultancy and invested a great deal of time and finance in order to achieve a cradle to grave service.

Authorised facility at 78A Cookstown Industrial Estate, Tallaght, Dublin 24

In addition to the transport/recovery we have also taken additional measures by being granted a “Certificate of Registration” by South Dublin County Council on its site at 78A Cookstown Industrial Estate, Tallaght, Dublin 24.

Certificate No:   COR-DS-14-0002-01

This permitted activity allows for the following:

“Operate a Facility for the reception and temporary storage of waste, returned or recovered refrigerant gases in refrigerant containers, halons in halon containers and fluorinated greenhouse gases in fluorinated greenhouse gas containers”

Registered to Transport

We are also listed under the Prior Annual Notification Scheme – PAN with the EPA for the transport of these gases when incidental to the activities.

Registered to Ship Internationally (Cross Border)

We have successfully registered with the National Trans Frontier Office (TFS) as an “Authorised Broker/Dealer” in accordance with Waste Management (Registration of Brokers and Dealers) Regulations 2008 S.I. No.113 of 2008.

Certificate No: IRE/AO38/16

Don’t get caught out. If you have any Halons, FE’s or Refrigerant Gases we can provide a fully Licensed/Certified solution to take care of it for you.

Dedicated to Compliancy

KSS Fire Suppression is now the only Fire Suppression Company that is fully certified to carry out FM200, Fe 36, Fe 13 Service Exchange directly in accordance with the control guidelines set out by the EPA and National TFS in the Rep of Ireland.

If you have a requirement please do not hesitate to contact us, we offer a fully compliant, time effective and cost efficient way to negotiate the movement of your gas.


Environmentally Friendly RE-HEALING™ FIRE FIGHTING FOAM CONCENTRATE in Ireland

Posted on 22 Aug 2014

FireTrade.ie launches the Solberg Environmentally Friendly RE-HEALING™ FIRE FIGHTING FOAM CONCENTRATE in Ireland.

RE-HEALING™ foam concentrates from SOLBERG are an innovative environmentally sustainable fluorosurfactant and fluoropolymer-free firefighting foam used to effectively extinguish Class B fuels with no environmental concerns for persistence, bioaccumulation or toxic breakdown. RE-HEALING foam concentrates can be used in fresh, salt or brackish water and possess excellent burn back resistance due to its remarkable flow and rapid sealing characteristics.

SOLBERG RE-HEALING foam concentrates are formulated using a new high performance synthetic foam technology to replace traditional AFFF and AR-AFFF foam concentrates and older fluoroprotein foams.

RE-HEALING foam concentrates are intended for use on Class B hydrocarbon and polar solvent fuel fires. Concentrates are available in 3%, 6% and 3×6 ATC formulations.  RE-HEALING foam concentrates can be used to prevent re-ignition of a liquid spill and control hazardous odors, and will improve extinguishment in deep-seated fires.

Foam non-air aspirating discharge devices as well as air aspirating discharge devices including standard sprinkler heads, can be used to obtain maximum results. The concentrates can also be used as a pre-mix solution. Re-HEALING foam concentrates are compatible with most dry powder agents, and provides even greater fire protection against three-dimensional fires.

RE-HEALING foam concentrates can be proportioned at the proper foam solution percentage using common foam proportioning devices such as: eductors, inline balanced pressure proportioners, ratio controllers, and self-educting nozzles.

Solberg manufactured products are thoroughly inspected and undergo rigorous quality control tests. These evaluations analyze the foam’s physical parameters as well as the finished product’s fire performance.


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